Work In Progress: Stag Runner

Auditioning green fabric for the Stag Table Runner.

Auditioning green fabric for the Stag Table Runner.

Placing red 2.5 inch squares for the Stag Table Runner.

Placing red 2.5 inch squares.

Hydration is important!

Hydration is important! Woman cannot live by coffee alone. (Though, she will admit to trying to live by coffee alone.)

After sewing the little red squares for the Stag Table Runner.

The little red squares are all sewn together for the center of the table runner.

Stag Table Runner Design

This is what the table runner will look like when it is complete.

It will be about 62 inches long and 15 inches wide. (The dining room table is 78 inches long.)

The white stags were originally supposed to be black, but after placing the white paper stencil of the stag on the red squares, I realized that the black was just too dark. The white stags shout Winter to me and really make the dark reds and green seem more alive. They’ll be appliqued in white or off-white fabric.

I haven’t yet picked the fabric for the stags. I’m thinking plain solid muslin, but I also have my eye on some floral fabric in white and pale green. I’m still debating the print idea. We’ll see.

The back… well, I’ve been tossing some ideas around for piecing the back in Autumnal colors. That way, the same runner could be on the table for half of the year. Storage space is small and precious in this house; I just don’t have space for a million different runners. So being able to use one runner for two seasons seems like a good plan. I’d just turn it over to the other side when Winter arrives. Again, we’ll see.

The Flower Queen

I have been working madly on my new fabric collection at Spoonflower, the Flower Queen. I’ve been working on it so much that I’ve pretty much dropped the ball on everything else. Oy. You might call it an obsession.

I haven’t been crafting. I haven’t been sewing. I haven’t kept in contact with family. I haven’t kept in contact with friends. I haven’t blogged. (You might have noticed that.) It’s completely eclipsed everything else (except for a small, somewhat serious bug I picked up somewhere last week – the less said of that, the better we’ll all feel).

Anyway, now that the main design of the collection is complete, I’m free to get back to my regular schedule. It’s time for quilting the Etchings Argyle Nine Patch Bed Scarf! Yay!

Yay? Sniff. I’ve been putting it off, honestly. The Flower Queen collection was just a somewhat convenient excuse for procrastination. This quilted bed scarf is the first serious bit of free motion quilting I’ll attempt. If I were wearing boots, I’d be shaking in them.

I hate being chicken.

 

The Easy Friday List, August 17

Fridays should be easy. Here’s a list of items that have made my life easier this past week. Maybe they can make your life easier, too.

Ball Point Needles: I don’t sew jersey often, but with all of the hemming and taking in of stretchy clothes that I’ve been doing lately, I’ve been using these ball point needles often. I love them. I haven’t had to pick out stitches nearly as often as I usually do when I sew clothes. Also, I haven’t had a pucker in my fabric in some time. So I’m definitely recommending these if you’re sewing jersey.

Daylight Floor Lamp: These things can be hideously expensive. I found one at Big LotsĀ  some time ago cheap. I use it constantly to check fabric selections against each other. I also use it any time I’m hand sewing painting macrame-ing scrapbooking beading anything-ing; the eyes have it easier when there’s enough light to, you know, see. My poor abused eyes need all the help they can get. It also makes a fabulous, if somewhat expensive, booklight.

Vitamin E Stick: Fall is practically here; my skin can prove it. The cheap-o vitamin E stick I get for about a buck at Wal-Mart helps all of the chapped and dried skin that appears about this time of year. Cuticles, lips, knuckles, knees, ankles, ears, whatever. A vitamin E stick can keep all these parts and more from becoming more of a problem than they have to be. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from my difficult skin: if I don’t take care of skin problems when they appear, they’ll only get worse when I ignore them. These sticks are a great way to keep any dry skin from becoming a huge problem (which can be exacerbated by handling fabric, yarn, and thread).